With Passover coming up in just a few weeks, I’ve started thinking about some of my favorite holiday treats and they all center around dessert. My father makes the best homemade sorbet every year and I am seriously counting down to see what flavors he’ll come up with this year. But when it comes to cake and cookies, I think I’m going to be in charge of supplying the snacks in my parents and in-laws houses so I’m working on the recipes now. I already know that I’ll be baking these amazing chocolate muffins from Jewhungry and my new sweet potato chip cookies so next up is the mandelbrodt! If you are wondering what mandelbrodt is, it’s really the same thing as an Italian biscotti but it’s the Eastern European version. In Yiddish, “mandelbrodt” means almond bread and you know I love almonds! So I scoured the internet for an easy biscotti or mandebrodt recipe that would be compliant to my gluten free, grain free, dairy free lifestyle and even tested a few that I just wasn’t happy with. So I ended up just adapting my favorite Passover biscotti recipe that reminds me of the mandelbrodt my Savtah used to bake. They were crunchy, sweet and covered inside and out with cinnamon. I added raisins to the batter for a more substantial cookie but my mom is already requesting that I make them again with chocolate chips. I guess I’ll be making a big batch of these at my parents house in a few weeks.

Cinnamon Raisin Mandelbrodt (Biscotti) 
makes 2 dozen biscotti

2 eggs
1 1/2 cups ground almonds
1/2 cup raisins
1/4 cup honey
1 Tbsp arrowroot powder (other options are potato starch and tapioca starch)
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp salt

I preheated the oven to 350 degrees F. and lined a baking sheet with parchment paper. I whisked together the eggs and honey then added the ground almonds, arrowroot powder, cinnamon and salt. I folded in the raisins. And the batter was done!

I split the batter in half and dropped the batter on to the baking sheet. I shaped the batter into a long rectangle shape with a spatula, around 10 inches long and 3-4 inches wide.

I baked the mandelbrodt logs for 25 minutes, until completely baked and browning around edges. The cookies will still be soft to the touch.

I set the mandelbrodt logs aside for 10 minutes to cool slightly then sliced 10-12 pieces with a serrated knife.

I turned the mandelbrot pieces on their sides and placed the pan back in the oven for 8-10 minutes, until the cookies are browning. Be careful to watch them so they don’t burn. When you remove the mandelbrodt from the oven, they will still be a bit soft but they will dry out as they cool.

I placed the mandelbrodt on a cooling rack and set them aside to cool and dry out for one hour.

Since these mandelbrodt are made with almond flour, they will turn soft if left on the counter in an airtight container for more than 2-3 days. I like to freeze the mandelbrodt in an airtight container for a few months so they don’t get soft and I can take one out whenever I’m craving a super crunchy cookie.

Cinnamon Raisin Mandelbrodt (Biscotti)
 
Author:
Serves: 2 dozen biscotti

Ingredients
  • 2 eggs
  • 1½ cups ground almonds
  • ½ cup raisins
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 Tbsp arrowroot powder (other options are potato starch and tapioca starch)
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • ⅛ tsp salt

Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Whisk together the eggs and honey then add the ground almonds, arrowroot powder, cinnamon and salt. Fold in the raisins.
  3. Split the batter in half and drop the batter on to the baking sheet. Shape the batter into a long rectangle shape with a spatula, around 10 inches long and 3-4 inches wide.
  4. Bake the mandelbrodt logs for 25 minutes, until completely baked and browning around edges. The cookies will still be soft to the touch.
  5. Set the mandelbrodt logs aside for 10 minutes to cool slightly then slice 10-12 pieces with a serrated knife.
  6. Turn the mandelbrot pieces on their sides and place the pan back in the oven for 8-10 minutes, until the cookies are browning. Be careful to watch them so they don’t burn. When you remove the mandelbrodt from the oven, they will still be a bit soft but they will dry out as they cool.
  7. Place the mandelbrodt on a cooling rack and set them aside to cool and dry out for one hour.
  8. Since these mandelbrodt are made with almond flour, they will turn soft if left on the counter in an airtight container for more than 2-3 days. You can freeze the mandelbrodt in an airtight container for a few months so they stay crunchy.